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A law firm in New York has already announced it is investigating potential insider trading claims against Equifax.

Krebs On Security is still awaiting word from an actual lawyer who’s looking at this contract, but let me offer my own two cents on this. ET: Equifax has updated their breach alert page to include the following response in regard to the unclear legalese: “In response to consumer inquiries, we have made it clear that the arbitration clause and class action waiver included in the Equifax and Trusted ID Premier terms of use does not apply to this cybersecurity incident.” Equifax will almost certainly see itself the target of multiple class action lawsuits as a result of this breach, but there is no guarantee those lawsuits will go the distance and result in a monetary windfall for affected consumers.

I cannot recall a previous data breach in which the breached company’s public outreach and response has been so haphazard and ill-conceived as the one coming right now from big-three credit bureau Equifax, which rather clumsily announced Thursday that an intrusion jeopardized Social security numbers and other information on 143 million Americans.

As noted in yesterday’s breaking story on this breach, the Web site that Equifax advertised as the place where concerned Americans could go to find out whether they were impacted by this breach — equifaxsecurity2017— is completely broken at best, and little more than a stalling tactic or sham at worst.

This site, mandated by Congress, gives consumers the right to one free credit report from each of the three major bureaus (Equifax, Trans Union and Experian) every year.

Second, all consumers have a right to request that the bureaus “freeze” their credit files, which bars potential creditors or anyone else from viewing your credit history or credit file unless you thaw the freeze (temporarily or permanently).

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